Yūsuf ibn Yaʿqūb ibn Isḥāq ibn ʾIbrāhīm (Arabic: يوسف ٱبن يعقوب ٱبن إسحاق ٱبن إبراهيم‎) is a prophet mentioned in the Quran,[1] and corresponds to Joseph, a person from the Tanakh, the Jewish religious scripture, and the Christian Bible, who was estimated to have lived in the 16th century BCE.[2] It is one of the common names in the Middle East and among Muslim nations. Of all of Jacob’s children, Joseph was the one given the gift of prophecy. Although the narratives of other prophets are mentioned in various Surahs, the complete narrative of Joseph is given only in one Surah, Yusuf, making it unique. It is said to be the most detailed narrative in the Qur’an and bears more details than the Biblical counterpart.[3] Yusuf is believed to have been the eleventh son of Yaʿqūb (Arabic: يعقوب‎, Jacob), and, according to many scholars, his favorite. According to Ibn Kathir, “Jacob had twelve sons who were the eponymous ancestors of the tribes of the Israelites. The noblest, the most exalted, the greatest of them was Joseph.”[4] The story begins with Joseph revealing a dream he had to his father, which Jacob recognizes.[5] In addition to the role of God in his life, the story of Yusuf and Zulaikha (Potiphar’s wife of the Old Testament) became a popular subject in Persian literature, where it became considerably elaborated over the centuries.————Prophet Joseph is a Persian-language mini-series originally broadcast in 2008, which tells the story of prophet Yusuf (or Joseph) according to the Islamic tradition. Realistic depictions of everyday life are represented. Each episode in the series begins with a poly-phonic recitation of the first four verses (ayah) of the chapter (surah) on Yusuf. The 45 episodes of the series are replete with themes on filial love, personal journey through life (within family and on one’s own), personal character, submission, prayer, prophethood, idolatry, monotheism, loyalty, betrayal, carnal desires, nature of various kinds of love, separation, abandonment, slavery, social organizations at various levels, nature of political authority, governance, strategy, various ideologies (and their implications), anticipation, and finally, forgiveness and salvation. The movie meanders through the existential lives of three principal characters (Yusuf, Zuleikha and Ya’qub) with dozens of other major and minor characters. The story in the series starts in the south of Babylon, in the second millennium BC, depicting Ya’qub’s battle against idolatry (of Ishtar) in Mesopotamia and the miraculous birth of Yusuf.

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